ANTIOCH CONFIDENTIAL – THE VIDEO

The video and article Antioch Confidential examines the closed control and destabilization of Antioch College by Antioch University. Antioch Confidential documents the damage to educational processes when "control" is mistaken for "leadership", and "command" is confused with "vision." The events taking place at Antioch College are a case study of recent trends in higher education today. The article and video are available for free use by librarians, teachers, educational workers and citizens concerned with the seizure of shared resources for private interests.

click the video stills below for supporting text and footnotes from the article version of antioch confidential

13 min - 35 sec

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13 min - 15 sec

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12 min - 45 sec

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12 min - 15 sec

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11 min - 00 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – The ACCC has placed one condition on their cash pledges—the money will only be given if the College is allowed to completely separate from the University and become an independent, freestanding organization. The University Board of Trustees approved a resolution that instructs University Chancellor Toni Murdock to create “a work group… to identify the major issues affecting the University’s interest in such a transaction.”

10 min - 40 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – In December, 2007 a group of deep-pocketed Antioch College alums incorporated the non-profit ACCC (Antioch College Continuation Corporation). The ACCC has secured cash pledges worth tens of millions of dollars in order to save Antioch College and its current purpose (a private residential liberal arts campus based on shared governance).

09 min - 50 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – The clearest example of how the Ad Hoc Committee’s C3 management model had compromised the alumni’s willingness to invest in the University-controlled College occurred in late 2007, when the first whiff of a proposed independent Antioch College brought forward $18 million in alumni pledges in a few short months following the University-announced intention to close the College.

09 min - 35 sec

From the Antioch College NCA Self-Study – The Franklin and Marshall study on the Baccalaureate Origins of Doctorate Recipients affirms that among 914 colleges and universities, Antioch College ranks 19th, in absolute numbers, in the number of Ph.D. degrees earned by alumni.

09 min - 25 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – In the middle of the hostage crisis, a visitor from the White House appeared: Kevin Geiss, a Senior Policy Analyst in the Homeland and National Security Division of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) at the Executive Office of the President. In 2004 the OSTP was the front-line defender of President Bush when 60 scientists (including 20 Nobel laureates) criticized the White House for distorting scientific facts about the environment and the search for unconventional weapons in Iraq. A Greene County EMA official stated that Geiss was visiting nearby Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and that he had extended his stay an extra day so that he could observe the exercise at the College. Geiss is an expert in biotoxicology. The Homeland and National Security Division of OSTP is one of the main advisory agencies to President Bush on the issue of pandemic.

08 min - 05 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – Among other things, the video demonstrates a surrealistic mix of control and openness as Antioch College Library staff keep the Library “open” during a Homeland Security training exercise run by a “private” military contractor in June, 2007. This contractor, L3/Titan, supplied the translators at Iraq’s Abu Ghraib prison. The L3/Titan company ranks second to the United States military (third is the British military) in the number of personnel killed in Iraq.

07 min - 50 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – The SWAT team wanted to use the Library because the twists and turns of the book stacks provided them with a challenging terrain for a forceful hostage rescue operation. In order to signal that the event was play and to minimize potential trauma to the child-actor-hostage, the terrorist held a water gun to the faux Antioch College student’s head; the SWAT team carried real weapons that had been disarmed. The hostage crisis was a surreal mix of work, play, and terror all conducted in the name of security, but for whom?

07 min - 35 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – In June, 2007 the Library staff responded to the militarized use of their facility by keeping it open to the public, by letting the Library be the Library and insisting that Antioch be Antioch during the exercise. The Library staff resisted the privatization of their workspace and bore witness to the events that transpired there.

07 min - 10 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – Earlier, Antioch College’s Olive Kettering Library staff had complained about the proposed hostage crisis and SWAT team drill that was to be held at the Library. Some Library staff had been, or were about to be, laid off and a long-time co-worker had very recently died. When Library staff questioned Sirk about the need for the drill at the Library (rather than the Science building) Sirk reportedly told them that it was necessary to do the drill because there was going to be pandemic at some point in the future and the campus must be prepared.

06 min - 30 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – Two days before the drill, Chief Altman offered to move the exercise to the Yellow Springs High School out of respect for the College community. Sirk’s Campus Taskforce turned down the offer (61)

footnote61 – In an interview for this article, Chief Altman stated he informed Sirk that the exercise could be moved to the Yellow Springs High School. Altman reported Sirk told him that the exercise would take place at the College as planned. College President Lawry stated he never recalled being told there was an option to move the drill to the High School. Shortly after the drill Chancellor Murdock instructed Lawry to give Sirk a pay raise.

05 min - 35 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential– Due to persistent secrecy and the flat-line economic model, the University’s Renewal Plan was dead on arrival at the College. By 2005, enrollment levels had plummeted so low that Jurasek now called Antioch a “micro-college,” a term used to describe schools with 350 or fewer students.

05 min - 25 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – The University’s Renewal Commission Report redesigned the College’s curriculum through a confidential process that had solicited minimal input from the full-time instructional faculty at the College. Antioch College Faculty member, Ann Filemyr, stated the following:

“They (the Renewal Commission) then wrote the document and sent it to the faculty and student body… We were so shocked because we didn’t have any idea what they were working on, we didn’t even know they were working on the curriculum. I had the naïve assumption that they were working on the administrative structure.”

05 min - 15 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – The College’s growth from 1997 to 2002 would be jettisoned… the College lost 1450 Degree-Seeking students from 2003 to 2007.

05 min - 00 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – This social distance, combined with an unstable College President’s Office and absent College CFO, made the College all but invisible as a living entity to the ULC and consequently the Board.

04 min - 35 sec

Excerpt from the Antioch College NCA Self-Study – Beginning in 1963… the college embarked on an expansion that quickly grew into a loose network of 35 campuses, clusters, and field centers by 1975. This expansion was predicated on the idea that educational opportunities should be made available in the communities where people lived and worked, in contrast with the idea of traditional college-age students leaving home to attend residential liberal arts colleges. This expansion sought to educate students from a wider range of ages, socio-economic backgrounds, geographic locations, and to serve not just the educational needs of individuals but the educational needs of communities. Most of these centers were located in densely populated urban centers, rather than the small town location of the original campus in Yellow Springs, Ohio. This enormous expansion resulted in the name change to Antioch University in December 1977, and ultimately to the present structure of the university. The university grew out of initiatives taken by the College.

04 min - 05 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – During the June, 2007 exercise, a right wing terrorist took six Antioch College students hostage and held them in the Library. Chief Altman said the scenario was collaboratively created between himself, the Greene County Emergency Management Agency, and personnel in charge of the Fairborn SWAT team.

04 min - 00 sec

[This scenario may have chosen due the appearance of the KKK on the College’s campus in 2004 as described below.]

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – By 2004, the College faculty was spending its human capital at a fast rate. The College had only 14 tenured faculty in the classroom on a full-time basis. Some faculty had been moved into administrative positions to cover for the vacancies created by freezes and layoffs. The 60% cut to the academic department support staff plus the implementation of a new University-designed curriculum severely taxed the human capital of the tenured faculty. These conditions, along with the still-missing Director of Multicultural Affairs, were further strained by an incident involving a claim of reverse discrimination by a student. The College community lacked the funded infrastructure found at many residential campuses to quickly engage in a sustained and meaningful dialogue about racial discrimination. Frustrated, and without a Director of Multicultural Affairs that might institutionally moderate such a dialogue, the student went to the press. KKK (Ku Klux Klan) members in the region seized on this incident for their publicity/recruitment needs. The Klan leafleted the campus and village, and a few weeks later staged a march through downtown Yellow Springs that was monitored by 125 law enforcement officials and about 50 firefighters and EMS personnel.

03 min - 00 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – For the most part, the College community received no meaningful communications about their role in the June, 2007 drill, in which fake bloody bodies, a fake terrorist and real SWAT team members swarmed the campus grounds. This alien event occurred just three days after the shocking and awful announcement by the Board of Trustees that Antioch College was closing— shocking because the Board never sought less drastic measures, and awful because the Board had never asked the Antioch College alumni for support under this dire scenario.

02 min - 25 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – Three days after the University Board announced the closing of Antioch College in June, 2007 a phalanx of paramilitary forces gathered at the Antioch College’s Coretta Scott King Center for Cultural and Intellectual Freedom. Every officer, agent, and commander handed over the ammunition clips from their weapons. A yellow plastic ribbon was tied to these real weapons to indicate they were now safe to wield at the College.

02 min - 00 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – The Olive Kettering Library is an open knowledge base nestled in a campus that had as its first president one of the founders of public education in America, Horace Mann. In keeping with its historic roots, the Library has a policy of open access to all campus-related materials generated by Library personnel. The source video material for Antioch Confidential is footage of the Homeland Security exercise shot by Library personnel and accessed by the Antioch Papers under the Library’s long-standing open access guidelines.

01 min - 45 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – As part of the exercise, University employee Lynda Sirk asked a Library staff member to videotape the events in the Library.

01 min - 35 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential #f101 – In June, 2007 the Library staff responded to the militarized use of their facility by keeping it open to the public, by letting the Library be the Library and insisting that Antioch be Antioch during the exercise. The Library staff resisted the privatization of their workspace and bore witness to the events that transpired there.

01 min - 05 sec

Excerpt from the Antioch College NCA Self-Study – The GLCA [Great Lakes Colleges Association] review team attended the weekly Community Meeting and was most impressed by student engagement in the college community… They said, in part: “Moreover, the students were engaged in caring and doing something about their own community. It seems that in this respect Antioch’s claim that its community is part of the educational experience of students is clearly supported. The students we heard were articulate and thoughtful, demonstrating their analytical skills as well as their moral compass in the context of their community.

01 min - 00 sec

Excerpt from the Antioch College NCA Self-Study – Antioch College has had a tradition of shared governance since the Presidency of Arthur Morgan in the 1920’s. Under Algo Henderson, who assumed the presidency (1933-1948) after Morgan, there was greater student involvement, so that now students participate in college decision making on virtually every level and at times in ways that are unique in higher education.

00 min - 35 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – The private military contractor who (in the words of a Greene County EMA official) “ran the show” during the Homeland Security exercise at Antioch College was L3/Titan. According to local rescue personnel, Titan agreed to produce separate evaluations for the College and Greene County after the exercise. Neither of these reports has been made public. One of the directors of the Titan Corporation (Michael Alexander) was on the Antioch Univeristy Board of Trustees when the decision to close the College was made. The Alexander family also gave about $500,000 in Titan stock to Antioch College’s faculty development fund.

00 min - 25 sec

Excerpt from the article Antioch Confidential – The collapse of the social distance between private space and public knowledge can be seen in the video Antioch Confidential, a companion to this article. Among other things, the video demonstrates a surrealistic mix of control and openness as Antioch College Library staff keep the Library “open” during a Homeland Security training exercise run by a “private” military contractor in June, 2007.

00 min - 05 sec

Antioch Confidential does not presume to tell the complete story of Antioch College and Antioch University, but rather stakes out a particular vantage point for considering events that have occurred over the last decade. Two modes of higher education management have been and continue to be in conflict at Antioch College, an institution historically based on shared governance and currently micromanaged by Antioch University. One presumes a private space of command, control and communications and the other supports a public realm of courage, responsibility, and shame (“Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity”).